The text below is adapted from a report available on the Greenpeace website

The text below is adapted from a report available on the Greenpeace website. Greenpeace is an organisation which aims to bring environmental problems to light and help to find solutions for these problems.

This report is open source and can be accessed on the internet without any payment or password. There is no indication that the content of this report has been peer reviewed before publication. However, the report provides a substantial list of references which allow us to check the facts it provides.

 

 

1115 words

FK Grade 7.0

FK Readability 58.2

< K2000 lexis: 79.5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Smart to Senseless: The Global Impact of 10 Years of Smartphones

 

GLOSSARY

 

 

Adapted from:

Jardim, E. (2017). From Smart to Senseless: The Global Impact of 10 Years of Smartphones. Retrieved from Greenpeace website: https://www.greenpeace.org/usa/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/FINAL-10YearsSmartphones-Report-Design-230217-Digital.pdf

upgrade (v); to add something new to an old machine or device / to buy a new and better device to replace an old one e.g. I like my old phone but it’s starting to get a little slow. I think I’ll upgrade to the latest Samsung next month.

carbon footprint (n); the amount of carbon which is produced by a person, a thing or an activity e.g. If you take the train instead of flying, you will reduce your carbon footprint.

rapidly (adv); quickly e.g. As soon as she started playing sport, she lost weight rapidly.

e-waste (n); electronic devices, such as mobile phones, laptops and tablets, which have been thrown out.

incinerator (n); a place where rubbish is burned

landfill (n); a large hole where rubbish produced in a city is dumped. When this hole is full of rubbish, it is generally covered over.

smelt (v); to heat metals (e.g. gold, silver, copper, aluminium) and turn them into liquid

supply chain (n): the people, activities and companies which work together to make a product e.g.

depletion (n); reducing the number, quality or strength of something e.g. The depletion of natural forests around the world means that less oxygen is produced by trees.

energy intensive (adj); describing something which takes a large amount of energy

 

 

In 10 short years, smartphones have changed the world, and have fuelled massive profits across the sector. But we cannot afford another 10 years of the same model. Now is the time to change the business model and get it right.

In 2007, almost no one owned a smartphone. In 2017, they are seemingly everywhere. Globally, among people aged 18-35, nearly 2 in every 3 people own a smartphone.1 In just 10 years, more than 7 billion smartphones have been produced. But as smartphones have spread across the world, the race to constantly upgrade devices that is fuelling record profits across the technology sector is also causing an ever-widening impact on the planet and the countries where these devices are manufactured. Examples of this impact can be seen in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where metals for these devices are mined, often in unsafe conditions. Workers involved in the production of mobile phones can also find that their health suffers because of exposure to dangerous chemicals during phone assembly. Regarding their environmental impact, the increasing complexity of these devices means they take more and more energy to produce, increasing their carbon footprint and a failure to recycle is contributing to rapidly growing amounts of e-waste.

All this for a gadget that the average consumer in the United States uses for just over two years.2 And sadly, the problems with smartphones do not end when a consumer is ready to repair or upgrade their phone. Major smartphone manufacturers are increasingly making it more difficult to replace the battery or add more memory. As a result, all the resources, energy, and human effort expended to make each phone are wasted if the phone is damaged, needs a new battery, or the user outgrows the storage capacity. This greatly reduces the lifespan of the product and drives demand for new products and maximum profit.

Starting with the release of Apple’s first iPhone, smartphone sales have soared, increasing year after year. In 2007, roughly 120 million smartphone units were sold worldwide. That number climbed to over 1.4 billion in 2016.3 By 2020, smartphone subscriptions are expected to hit 6.1 billion, or roughly 70% of the global population.4 Among 18 to 35 year olds, smartphone ownership is already 62% globally, and in some countries, such as the United States, Germany, and South Korea, it tops 90%.5

While part of the increasing rate of smartphone sales is caused by first-time buyers, 78% is estimated to be attributed to existing smartphone consumers replacing their phones.6 In the United States, the average replacement cycle was just over 2 years, at 26 months. Even though most smartphones still function for far longer than this, roughly two thirds of American consumers choose to upgrade for the latest features.7

Indeed, the current business model for both manufacturers and service providers depends on the frequent replacement of devices. This model does not take into account the long-term impacts of the production and disposal of all these devices— more than 7 billion since 2007.8

Generally speaking, phones are predominantly made up of a combination of metals including rare earth elements, glass, and plastic. Aluminium, cobalt, and gold are just a few of the more than 60 elements used to make advanced electronics such as smartphones, and they are obtained from mining operations around the world, or in some cases, from recycled materials. Plastic is made from crude oil, and while some larger electronic devices contain some post-consumer recycled plastic, this is still unusual in smartphone manufacture. Integrated circuits, such as memory chips, CPUs, and graphic chips are critical components of smartphones. These are made up of silicon wafers, the making of which requires a great deal of energy and water.9

While the amount of each element in a single device may seem small, the combined impacts of mining and processing these precious materials for 7 billion devices, and counting, is significant. The search for ever increasing amounts of these materials damages the earth and could potentially lead to the depletion of critical elements, such as indium, which is estimated to have just 14 years of supply.10

Despite these problems, the majority of the materials used to make smartphones are not recycled at the end of the product’s life. In 2014, less than 16% of global e-waste was estimated to be recycled in the formal sector—much of the rest likely went to landfill or incinerators or was exported11 where dangerous informal recycling operations threaten the health of local communities.12

Even when e-waste is handled by a formal recycler, the complex design of smartphones makes safe and efficient recycling challenging. As they are difficult to take part, these devices are often sent for smelting. Given the small amounts of a wide diversity of materials and substances in small devices, smelting is inefficient, or incapable, at recovering many of the materials, and plastics are burned in the process.

Electronics manufacturing is highly energy intensive and its energy footprint is growing significantly, as the volume and complexity of our electronics devices continues to expand. Various lifecycle analyses find the manufacturing of devices is by far the most carbon intensive phase of smartphones, accounting for nearly three quarters of total CO2 emissions.20 Since 2007, roughly 968 TWh has been used to manufacture smartphones. That is almost as much electricity for one year’s power for India, which used 973 TWh in 2014.13

Smartphones have become increasingly energy efficient over the years, which has helped to decrease greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions produced when we use these devices. Despite these improvements, the manufacturing phase remains incredibly reliant on fossil fuels. The vast majority of smartphone production occurs in Asia. China alone accounts for 57% of global telephone exports.22 In China, the energy mix used to power manufacturing plants comes from an electricity grid dominated by coal, at 67% —a key factor driving the high carbon footprint of electronics devices, which in turn contributes to global warming. While a few smartphone companies have begun to report GHG emissions associated with the manufacturing of their products, including from their suppliers, Apple is the only major smartphone manufacturer who has committed to making its supply chain 100% renewably powered. Since making this commitment, Apple has signed two major contracts for renewable electricity in China. Two of its suppliers have also made a commitment to become 100% renewably powered, and Foxconn has committed to build a 400 MW of solar plant to power its Apple’s iPhone factory in Zhengzhou.15

The smartphone is perhaps one of the best examples of human inventiveness of all time. However, further innovation is needed to improve our current wasteful and harmful system of manufacture and use. As IT companies have shown again and again, technology and creativity can be used as powerful forces to change outdated business models. Leading IT companies can become the greatest supporters of “closed-loop” production (production which uses only recycled materials) model and a renewably powered future.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Pew Research Center, February, 2016, “Smartphone Ownership and Internet Usage Continues to Climb in Emerging Economies” http://www.pewglobal.org/2016/02/22/smartphone-ownership-and-internet-usagecontinues- to-climb-in-emerging-economies/

2. Recon Analytics, February 2015, “2014 US Mobile Phone sales fall by 15% and handset replacement cycle lengthens to historic high” http:// reconanalytics.com/2015/02/2014-us-mobile-phone-sales-fall-by-15- and-handset-replacement-cycle-lengthens-to-historic-high/

3. Gartner Newsroom, March 11 2009, “Gartner Says Worldwide Smartphone Sales Reached Its Lowest Growth Rate With 3.7 Per Cent Increase in Fourth Quarter of 2008” http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/910112

4. Ericsson Mobility Report, June 2015, http://www.ericsson.com/res/docs/2015/ericsson-mobility-report-june-2015.pdf

5. Pew Research Center, February, 2016, “Smartphone Ownership and Internet Usage Continues to Climb in Emerging Economies” http://www.pewglobal.org/2016/02/22/smartphone-ownership-and-internet-usagecontinues-to-climb-in-emerging-economies/

6. Strategy Analytics, December 2016, “Global Smartphone Sales by Replacement Sales vs. Sales to First Time Buyers by 88 Countries: 2013– 2022” https://www.strategyanalytics.com/strategy-analytics/blogs/smart-phones/2016/12/23/78-of-global-smartphones-will-be-sold-toreplacement-buyers-in-2017#.WKcjVJgrKqA

7. Recon Analytics, February 2015, “2014 US Mobile Phone sales fall by 15% and handset replacement cycle lengthens to historic high” http:// reconanalytics.com/2015/02/2014-us-mobile-phone-sales-fall-by-15- and-handset-replacement-cycle-lengthens-to-historic-high/

8. Gartner and IDC. See Appendix A.

9. Eric D. Williams, Robert U. Ayers, and Miriam Heller, September 2002, “The 1.7 Kilogram Microchip: Energy and Material Use in the Production of Semiconductor Devices” https://www.ece.jhu.edu/~andreou/495/Bibliography/Processing/EnergyCosts/ EnergyAndMaterialsUseInMicrochips_EST.pdf

10. Geological Survey of Queensland, September 2014, “Indium opportunities in Queensland” https://www.dnrm.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_ file/0019/238105/indium.pdf

11. Baldé, C.P., Wang, F., Kuehr, R., Huisman, J., United Nations University, 2015, “The Global E-waste Monitor – 2014” https://i.unu.edu/media/unu. edu/news/52624/UNU-1stGlobal-E-Waste-Monitor-2014-small.pdf

12. Labunska, I., Abdallah, M A.-E., Eulaers, I., Covaci, A., Tao, F., Wang, M., Santillo, D., Johnston, P. & Harrad, S., Greenpeace Research Laboratories, November 2014, “Human dietary intake of organohalogen contaminants at e-waste recycling sites in Eastern China” http://www.greenpeace.to/greenpeace/?p=1835w.greenalliance.org.uk/a_circular_economy_for_smart_devices.php

13. Greenpeace USA, January 2017, “Clicking Clean: Who is Winning the Race to Build A Green Internet?” http://www.greenpeace.org/international/en/ publications/Campaign-reports/Climate-Reports/clicking-clean-2017/24 Apple, September 2016, “Apple joins RE100, announces supplier cleanenergy pledges” http://www.apple.com/newsroom/2016/09/apple-joinsre100-announces-supplier-clean-energy-pledges.html

14. Apple, October 2015, “Apple Launches New Clean Energy Programs in China to Promote Low-Carbon Manufacturing and Green Growth” http:// www.apple.com/pr/library/2015/10/22Apple-Launches-New-Clean-Energy-Programs-in-China-To-Promote-Low-Carbon-Manufacturing-and-Green-Growth.html

Consider an example from NASA’s COVID-19 dashboard

Consider an example from NASA’s COVID-19 dashboard of the anthropogenic changes caused during the global COVID-19 shutdowns at: https://earthdata.nasa.gov/covid19/ 

Click on the “Discoveries” tab in the top right and choose one of the  location specific examples from within the discoveries as the basis for  your essayy. For example, you could choose to discuss the changes from  the Air Quality discovery Chapter 3.2 regarding air quality in Lima,  Peru.

PROPOSAL – SEPTEMBER 13TH 11:59pm
Define your  project by submitting a brief paragraph proposal describing the type of  change that occurred and the location that you are interested in  researching. Include a screenshot of the image you are choosing to  discuss. Submit your proposal by September 13th at 11:59pm. Include at  least three citations that may be relevant to your paperr.

Generalist Social Work

Overview

Chapter 6

Generalist Social Work

Social workers who employ a wide range of approaches with different theories and emphases

Primarily used to guide and coordinate services

p.i.

 

 

Micro Practice

 

 

 

 

Case management

Small group practice

Macro Practice

Administrators

Intervention at the community level

Working in organizations

Moving legislation forward for social change

Strengths Based Perspective

Using person-in-environment

Each individual, group, family and community has strengths

Trauma and abuse, illness and struggle may be injurious but they may be a source of challenge and opportunity

Every environment is full of resources

Diversity Perspective

Being aware of and sensitive to human diversity

Value- Dignity and worth of the person

Ethical Principle: Social workers respect the inherent dignity and worth of the person.

 

Historical Influence

Psychodynamic Theory- Freud. People’s behaviors were purposeful and determined and some determinants were unconscious

Psychosocial Treatment- influenced by Anna Freud and Erikson

Core tenant interacting genetic, biological and sociocultural factors explain the cognitive and emotional processes both conscious and unconscious that motivate human behavior

Current Theory Base

Problem solving Method

Task-centered casework

Cognitive Behavioral Theory

Crisis Theory and Crisis Intervention

Task Centered and Problem Centered Theory

CBT

Based on the belief that how and what a person thinks determines or contributes to how the person feels and behaves

Maladaptive behaviors can be explained by irrational or distorted thinking that results from misperceptions and misinterpretations of the environment

What is Cognitive Therapy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=07JqktJGyyA

Aaron Beck, Father of CBT

Developed the BDI, Beck Depression Inventory

CBT Worksheet

Crisis Theory & Crisis Intervention

Crisis- situation in which a person’s normal coping mechanisms are inadequate or are not working

Crisis Intervention- short term model designed to assist victims and survivors to return to their pre-crisis level of functioning

Crisis in Action

Mindfulness-Based Theories & Therapies

MBCBT- Mindfulness-based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy- learning about the relationship between thoughts and feelings and how to be more fully present using meditation

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction- learn to actively focus on what is happening in the present moment

8 week program

Gain mindfulness skills with medication

Yoga

 

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/consumer-health/in-depth/mindfulness-exercises/art-20046356

Mindfulness in Action

Deep Breaths

https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrWnenIvi9hWgUA2DEPxQt.;_ylu=Y29sbwNncTEEcG9zAzEEdnRpZANDMjAxNF8xBHNlYwNwaXZz?p=mindfulness+breathing+exercise&type=asbw_8063_CHW_US_tid22041&param1=%2Fk7YAyUoOVNE0MvR1Q2KnVyDPreUKM66V7dAfgcQHDP5Gm2mc%2Fvui3pcw3hMv3KN&param2=9dUI1n2R0BLDxNuWfiP4aSFOTltNdSPoIx38%2BUf%2FiXrvPdoGmStdlfwLFZYDvqkAJrWWk4yNReCLnBD%2FqPsDZd7olTZcV8HMx1G%2Fk786sE2Tis1g8dJd8zxVWs%2BbKztBnq1TfqUiqPYK9pXifXmJF23GuXP%2F%2FuMqmznMxQq%2BppBABkAUYrsGxOzuXmFs%2FgGQwUJ4ZXwoM815tGlzK9UUqMhWYmpz21YQuou9Oi6P8RANE%2BCkWMz2wQkmqdXMr7bRCs3oj2vSd5I8gYGFKGRSBIjJbE6OfMOuZan4IhVI%2Ffo%3D&param3=NwVEMR%2FzKcG52XsVBYEh2zk2Yklq85vdfspZPoqz2M1qypHRDDTed5vIiOf0QJloJAws3N4BZ2OFCPQG%2BRw4WpTnzaTq2VmIHxERXcUW3rVQCtxOG%2BsIEOUp0%2Ff9ylXTGucyJu3wBF4BE4auNWzgxO3StFjks4kbjSOSKoAXCTid8NxxCOM9aXLF24eM27GD75rWM1JeyRpF%2F45YK1TAC9R5TfAyU89EE0S4m94aR83p%2FgjnpznIb4weH2T7DhGRje3iKJerX9ywLAWbQwMmp20Buq2Zs4ti1FRkzxb%2FMGao%2FHBH5Ays9j%2F3JrhKpfMkRj3iEwASpKeeWHfVUb54%2Bhs1xj1Do8CGdFWcryeRNuyxKlstG9nlAQdHM7c%2FxyBu7U1ExvlqmuMZk6JYYQqeYg%3D%3D&param4=vChxdiCgCsW3Vuej1Rmo%2FkfUWTODnyFqFtL3z8sXYDA%3D&hsimp=yhs-syn&hspart=iba&ei=UTF-8&fr=yhs-iba-syn#index=-99&id=2&vid=ca5371d1e19545fa6ebe12c959a23f61&action=view

Case Management

“A collaborative process of assessment, planning, facilitation and advocacy for options and services to meet an individual’s needs through communication and available resources to promote quality cost-effective outcomes”

Case Management Process

Engagement/Empathy

Rapport and Relationship Building

Evaluation/Assessment

Identifying needs, Biopsychosocialemotional

Intervention

Referring to agencies, assisting with service delivery

 

Closure

Ethical Considerations

Rural social workers higher risk for dual relationships

Duty to report

Danger to self

Danger to others

Elder abuse

Child abuse

Generalist Social work with Groups

Social Action Groups

Achieve social change when unacceptable societal conditions have been neglected or inadequately addressed by agencies of authority

Self-Help Groups

Brining people together who share a specific need problem or concern to provide social and emotional support

AA biggest example of a self help group

Support and Counseling

Parents who have lost a child

Children of divorced parents

Socialization Groups

Reduce isolation by brining people together for a shared purpose

Ethical Considerations with Groups

Confidentiality

Need clearly defined group roles

When to intervene on an individual level and group level

Group safety & Cultural sensitivity

Community Practice

Community Organizing

Bringing people together to work for needed change

Community Planning

Collecting data, analyzing a situation and developing strategies to move from a problem to a solution

Community Development

Helping individuals improve the conditions of their lives by increased involvement in thee social and economic conditions of their communities

Community Change

Desired outcome

The text below is adapted from a report available on the Greenpeace website

The text below is adapted from a report available on the Greenpeace website. Greenpeace is an organisation which aims to bring environmental problems to light and help to find solutions for these problems.

This report is open source and can be accessed on the internet without any payment or password. There is no indication that the content of this report has been peer reviewed before publication. However, the report provides a substantial list of references which allow us to check the facts it provides.

 

 

1115 words

FK Grade 7.0

FK Readability 58.2

< K2000 lexis: 79.5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Smart to Senseless: The Global Impact of 10 Years of Smartphones

 

GLOSSARY

 

 

Adapted from:

Jardim, E. (2017). From Smart to Senseless: The Global Impact of 10 Years of Smartphones. Retrieved from Greenpeace website: https://www.greenpeace.org/usa/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/FINAL-10YearsSmartphones-Report-Design-230217-Digital.pdf

upgrade (v); to add something new to an old machine or device / to buy a new and better device to replace an old one e.g. I like my old phone but it’s starting to get a little slow. I think I’ll upgrade to the latest Samsung next month.

carbon footprint (n); the amount of carbon which is produced by a person, a thing or an activity e.g. If you take the train instead of flying, you will reduce your carbon footprint.

rapidly (adv); quickly e.g. As soon as she started playing sport, she lost weight rapidly.

e-waste (n); electronic devices, such as mobile phones, laptops and tablets, which have been thrown out.

incinerator (n); a place where rubbish is burned

landfill (n); a large hole where rubbish produced in a city is dumped. When this hole is full of rubbish, it is generally covered over.

smelt (v); to heat metals (e.g. gold, silver, copper, aluminium) and turn them into liquid

supply chain (n): the people, activities and companies which work together to make a product e.g.

depletion (n); reducing the number, quality or strength of something e.g. The depletion of natural forests around the world means that less oxygen is produced by trees.

energy intensive (adj); describing something which takes a large amount of energy

 

 

In 10 short years, smartphones have changed the world, and have fuelled massive profits across the sector. But we cannot afford another 10 years of the same model. Now is the time to change the business model and get it right.

In 2007, almost no one owned a smartphone. In 2017, they are seemingly everywhere. Globally, among people aged 18-35, nearly 2 in every 3 people own a smartphone.1 In just 10 years, more than 7 billion smartphones have been produced. But as smartphones have spread across the world, the race to constantly upgrade devices that is fuelling record profits across the technology sector is also causing an ever-widening impact on the planet and the countries where these devices are manufactured. Examples of this impact can be seen in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where metals for these devices are mined, often in unsafe conditions. Workers involved in the production of mobile phones can also find that their health suffers because of exposure to dangerous chemicals during phone assembly. Regarding their environmental impact, the increasing complexity of these devices means they take more and more energy to produce, increasing their carbon footprint and a failure to recycle is contributing to rapidly growing amounts of e-waste.

All this for a gadget that the average consumer in the United States uses for just over two years.2 And sadly, the problems with smartphones do not end when a consumer is ready to repair or upgrade their phone. Major smartphone manufacturers are increasingly making it more difficult to replace the battery or add more memory. As a result, all the resources, energy, and human effort expended to make each phone are wasted if the phone is damaged, needs a new battery, or the user outgrows the storage capacity. This greatly reduces the lifespan of the product and drives demand for new products and maximum profit.

Starting with the release of Apple’s first iPhone, smartphone sales have soared, increasing year after year. In 2007, roughly 120 million smartphone units were sold worldwide. That number climbed to over 1.4 billion in 2016.3 By 2020, smartphone subscriptions are expected to hit 6.1 billion, or roughly 70% of the global population.4 Among 18 to 35 year olds, smartphone ownership is already 62% globally, and in some countries, such as the United States, Germany, and South Korea, it tops 90%.5

While part of the increasing rate of smartphone sales is caused by first-time buyers, 78% is estimated to be attributed to existing smartphone consumers replacing their phones.6 In the United States, the average replacement cycle was just over 2 years, at 26 months. Even though most smartphones still function for far longer than this, roughly two thirds of American consumers choose to upgrade for the latest features.7

Indeed, the current business model for both manufacturers and service providers depends on the frequent replacement of devices. This model does not take into account the long-term impacts of the production and disposal of all these devices— more than 7 billion since 2007.8

Generally speaking, phones are predominantly made up of a combination of metals including rare earth elements, glass, and plastic. Aluminium, cobalt, and gold are just a few of the more than 60 elements used to make advanced electronics such as smartphones, and they are obtained from mining operations around the world, or in some cases, from recycled materials. Plastic is made from crude oil, and while some larger electronic devices contain some post-consumer recycled plastic, this is still unusual in smartphone manufacture. Integrated circuits, such as memory chips, CPUs, and graphic chips are critical components of smartphones. These are made up of silicon wafers, the making of which requires a great deal of energy and water.9

While the amount of each element in a single device may seem small, the combined impacts of mining and processing these precious materials for 7 billion devices, and counting, is significant. The search for ever increasing amounts of these materials damages the earth and could potentially lead to the depletion of critical elements, such as indium, which is estimated to have just 14 years of supply.10

Despite these problems, the majority of the materials used to make smartphones are not recycled at the end of the product’s life. In 2014, less than 16% of global e-waste was estimated to be recycled in the formal sector—much of the rest likely went to landfill or incinerators or was exported11 where dangerous informal recycling operations threaten the health of local communities.12

Even when e-waste is handled by a formal recycler, the complex design of smartphones makes safe and efficient recycling challenging. As they are difficult to take part, these devices are often sent for smelting. Given the small amounts of a wide diversity of materials and substances in small devices, smelting is inefficient, or incapable, at recovering many of the materials, and plastics are burned in the process.

Electronics manufacturing is highly energy intensive and its energy footprint is growing significantly, as the volume and complexity of our electronics devices continues to expand. Various lifecycle analyses find the manufacturing of devices is by far the most carbon intensive phase of smartphones, accounting for nearly three quarters of total CO2 emissions.20 Since 2007, roughly 968 TWh has been used to manufacture smartphones. That is almost as much electricity for one year’s power for India, which used 973 TWh in 2014.13

Smartphones have become increasingly energy efficient over the years, which has helped to decrease greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions produced when we use these devices. Despite these improvements, the manufacturing phase remains incredibly reliant on fossil fuels. The vast majority of smartphone production occurs in Asia. China alone accounts for 57% of global telephone exports.22 In China, the energy mix used to power manufacturing plants comes from an electricity grid dominated by coal, at 67% —a key factor driving the high carbon footprint of electronics devices, which in turn contributes to global warming. While a few smartphone companies have begun to report GHG emissions associated with the manufacturing of their products, including from their suppliers, Apple is the only major smartphone manufacturer who has committed to making its supply chain 100% renewably powered. Since making this commitment, Apple has signed two major contracts for renewable electricity in China. Two of its suppliers have also made a commitment to become 100% renewably powered, and Foxconn has committed to build a 400 MW of solar plant to power its Apple’s iPhone factory in Zhengzhou.15

The smartphone is perhaps one of the best examples of human inventiveness of all time. However, further innovation is needed to improve our current wasteful and harmful system of manufacture and use. As IT companies have shown again and again, technology and creativity can be used as powerful forces to change outdated business models. Leading IT companies can become the greatest supporters of “closed-loop” production (production which uses only recycled materials) model and a renewably powered future.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Pew Research Center, February, 2016, “Smartphone Ownership and Internet Usage Continues to Climb in Emerging Economies” http://www.pewglobal.org/2016/02/22/smartphone-ownership-and-internet-usagecontinues- to-climb-in-emerging-economies/

2. Recon Analytics, February 2015, “2014 US Mobile Phone sales fall by 15% and handset replacement cycle lengthens to historic high” http:// reconanalytics.com/2015/02/2014-us-mobile-phone-sales-fall-by-15- and-handset-replacement-cycle-lengthens-to-historic-high/

3. Gartner Newsroom, March 11 2009, “Gartner Says Worldwide Smartphone Sales Reached Its Lowest Growth Rate With 3.7 Per Cent Increase in Fourth Quarter of 2008” http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/910112

4. Ericsson Mobility Report, June 2015, http://www.ericsson.com/res/docs/2015/ericsson-mobility-report-june-2015.pdf

5. Pew Research Center, February, 2016, “Smartphone Ownership and Internet Usage Continues to Climb in Emerging Economies” http://www.pewglobal.org/2016/02/22/smartphone-ownership-and-internet-usagecontinues-to-climb-in-emerging-economies/

6. Strategy Analytics, December 2016, “Global Smartphone Sales by Replacement Sales vs. Sales to First Time Buyers by 88 Countries: 2013– 2022” https://www.strategyanalytics.com/strategy-analytics/blogs/smart-phones/2016/12/23/78-of-global-smartphones-will-be-sold-toreplacement-buyers-in-2017#.WKcjVJgrKqA

7. Recon Analytics, February 2015, “2014 US Mobile Phone sales fall by 15% and handset replacement cycle lengthens to historic high” http:// reconanalytics.com/2015/02/2014-us-mobile-phone-sales-fall-by-15- and-handset-replacement-cycle-lengthens-to-historic-high/

8. Gartner and IDC. See Appendix A.

9. Eric D. Williams, Robert U. Ayers, and Miriam Heller, September 2002, “The 1.7 Kilogram Microchip: Energy and Material Use in the Production of Semiconductor Devices” https://www.ece.jhu.edu/~andreou/495/Bibliography/Processing/EnergyCosts/ EnergyAndMaterialsUseInMicrochips_EST.pdf

10. Geological Survey of Queensland, September 2014, “Indium opportunities in Queensland” https://www.dnrm.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_ file/0019/238105/indium.pdf

11. Baldé, C.P., Wang, F., Kuehr, R., Huisman, J., United Nations University, 2015, “The Global E-waste Monitor – 2014” https://i.unu.edu/media/unu. edu/news/52624/UNU-1stGlobal-E-Waste-Monitor-2014-small.pdf

12. Labunska, I., Abdallah, M A.-E., Eulaers, I., Covaci, A., Tao, F., Wang, M., Santillo, D., Johnston, P. & Harrad, S., Greenpeace Research Laboratories, November 2014, “Human dietary intake of organohalogen contaminants at e-waste recycling sites in Eastern China” http://www.greenpeace.to/greenpeace/?p=1835w.greenalliance.org.uk/a_circular_economy_for_smart_devices.php

13. Greenpeace USA, January 2017, “Clicking Clean: Who is Winning the Race to Build A Green Internet?” http://www.greenpeace.org/international/en/ publications/Campaign-reports/Climate-Reports/clicking-clean-2017/24 Apple, September 2016, “Apple joins RE100, announces supplier cleanenergy pledges” http://www.apple.com/newsroom/2016/09/apple-joinsre100-announces-supplier-clean-energy-pledges.html

14. Apple, October 2015, “Apple Launches New Clean Energy Programs in China to Promote Low-Carbon Manufacturing and Green Growth” http:// www.apple.com/pr/library/2015/10/22Apple-Launches-New-Clean-Energy-Programs-in-China-To-Promote-Low-Carbon-Manufacturing-and-Green-Growth.html

How would you demonstrate empathy for your client (be specific)?

  1. How would you demonstrate empathy for your client (be specific)? How is this different than showing sympathy to your client?
  2. Out of the theories and frameworks discussed in Chapter 6, which one  do you think would benefit your client the most? Why? Include a  citation from the text to support your answer.
  3. After reviewing the NASW Code of Ethics Ethical Standards “Social  Workers’ Ethical Responsibilities to Clients,” pick one of the 16 areas  listed (1.01 through 1.16). Describe how it could come up as an ethical  dilemma with the Harjo family and how you would address it.
  4. Rank 1-6 (in a list) the importance of the Social Work core values  as you see them relating to your case study. Then explain how the top 2  values relate to your case study.
  5. What is one question that you have about your case study/client an

Detail the impact the changing consumer demographics will have on long-term care.

• Detail the impact the changing consumer demographics will have on long-term care.

• Based on the statistics from the Director of Administration on Aging, detail how the CMS can expect facilities to focus on quality and outcomes relating to long-term care. How will this focus impact providers operationally?

• Detail how these changes will impact the delivery of long-term care.

• Detail what policies and regulatory measures you would take as the Director of CMS.

• Detail what additional long-term strategies you would pursue to make national resources meet the nation’s need for chronic care.

Evaluate the history of cryptography from its origins

Evaluate the history of cryptography from its origins.  Analyze how cryptography was used and describe how it grew within history.

The above submission should be two pages in length with a minimum of four proper scholarly references and adhere to APA formatting standards

Assess the immediate staffing needs at BNH.

Overview

Blumberg’s Nursing Home (BNH) is a 100-bed Medicare and Medicaid  certified facility in suburban Philadelphia, PA. The administrator  recently terminated the facility’s DON, receptionist, and dietary aid  for inappropriate conduct. They had all been involved in purchasing and  using illegal substances on facility grounds. The facility staff and  many of the more lucid residents have found out about the incident.

The charge nurse has been appointed interim DON. The human resource  manager has sent a memo to all staff informing them of a mandatory staff  meeting to discuss BNH’s code of ethics and to provide additional  training on workplace culture. Because federal law requires that there  be at least one registered nurse on duty for a minimum of eight hours a  day, seven days a week, and that the DON must be a registered nurse (RN)  which the interim DON is not—BNH is out of compliance.

Instructions

Write a 4–6 page paper in which you:

  1. Assess the immediate staffing needs at BNH. Prioritize the order  in which BNH should fill the main unstaffed position. Justify your  selection.
  2. Considering the reason behind the termination of the employees,  formulate a human resources policy that addresses inappropriate conduct  in the workplace, the process of reporting inappropriate conduct, and  the consequences of violating the policy. Explain your rationale.
  3. Per the text, an effective long-term care facility administrator  must have both leadership and management skills. Propose at least one  way the administrator in this case must demonstrate quality leadership  skills and one way the administrator must demonstrate quality management  skills in the aftermath of this crisis so as to improve and maintain  staff and resident morale.
  4. Recommend a strategy for BNH to use the Quality Indicator Survey  to improve administrative practices and ensure future compliance at the  facility. Justify your recommendation.
  5. Use at least three quality academic resources. Note: Wikipedia and other similar websites do not qualify as academic resources.

This course requires the use of Strayer Writing Standards. For  assistance and information, please refer to the Strayer Writing  Standards link in the left-hand menu of your course. Check with your  professor for any additional instructions.

The specific course learning outcome associated with this assignment is:

  • Formulate a human resource policy that addresses inappropriate conduct in the workplace, administration leadership skills, and strategies for improving administrative practices.

Describe the lives and contributions of Buddy Bolden, Joe Oliver and Sidney Bechet

Answer the following questions in a Word document, then upload.

1. Describe the “front line” of a 1920s-era jazz band. Be descriptive, your answer must be a full paragraph in length.

2. Why is the Original Dixieland Jazz Band so important to the study of jazz history.

3. Describe the lives and contributions of Buddy Bolden, Joe Oliver and Sidney Bechet.

This is a reminder that MLA formatting is required in my course for all submitted assignments:

Upper left hand side header:

Your Name

Professor’s Name

MUSI 1306

DATE

(All double spaced).

The paragraphs should all be indented and double-spaced in a 12-point type.

Describe a Challenge you faced, the Action you took,

C.A.R.B. Stories

Describe a Challenge you faced, the Action you took, the Result of that action, and what the Benefit was to individuals/the organization. Example of C.A.R.B. stories are attached. The goal is for you to incorporate such a story in a resume, cover letter, or even job interview!